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7/18/2017 1:27:51 PM

Exterior paint and a few tips...



I am going to officially call the front of the house... Done.  I know, there are a couple spots like the last board where the patio bricks are, under the porch lights I want to replace, and the edge that needs trim replaced from a satellite dish, but I am not counting those specialty spots that need other work done first.  And besides... I just need to be able to call some part of this "Done".

Here it is...

 

Sadly, my blog has bogged down since basically the entire summer is dedicated to painting the house.  So, I thought I would throw in a few tips I have learned.

The first being... if you don't have it, make it.  Last year as I was painting about 2/3 of the large soffit (overhang) on the front of the house, I struggled mightily to not over-roll the white trim onto the back of the facia boards (like the previous "professional" painters did all over the place).  This is a wildly difficult task while standing high up on a two story ladder and painting above, behind, and hanging half-way backwards with both arms shaking from the strain to mini-roll accurately with an extension pole and not smudge it.  I did pretty well over all, but even so, two spots bumped and will need touched up when hubby is home to move the big ladder around with me.

 

So, especially since touch up in the rest of these areas is probably impossible because of ground angling away from the house, I needed something to guard against bumps.  Viola!  My second mini-roller, a few holes, and one screw later, and I have a bump rail that protects from over-roll, but folds out of the way when loading paint onto the roller and for the close-in section of rail.

 
 

 
 

Second tip is to use what works.  I know it sounds insane to be painting my whole house with a mini-roller, but when it is just the right size for the siding boards and generally works to push paint under the board above without having to brush every single edge, it just ends up being the way to go.  Yes... yes, it does take forever.  But short of hiring a company to wildly spray a thin coat over the siding like was done before (and is already failing), it is sadly the "fastest" way I have found.  If it works... use it.

 

And of course, last but definitely not least, the ever present "90% Prep".  While on the exterior of a house it may be a little easier to roll your trim without needing to tape off the siding, or to over-brush where you know you will come back with the trim color on top, it is still time saving in the end to do good prep work.  

For example... in addition to the nails all being in the wrong place (exposed, instead of hidden under the siding board above), they are almost all shot a little deeper than they should be.  This leaves tiny pin-holes all around the nail, and sometimes worse, where water can get into the press-board siding and cause swelling, flaking, and water damage.  While it takes an annoying amount of time to seal over every nail head, it will save a ton of siding repair/scraping/filling later.  And just like in an interior wall, for some reason even the tiniest holes never fill with paint.  Sealing them first saves a lot of time compared to trying to slop paint over and over to fill the holes.



And of course, scraping and sanding flaking paint away will make new paint stick to the wood and last that much longer.  This is probably my least favorite step, but luckily it isn't the whole house... mostly just the wide facia boards around the top of the house.  It is still a whole lot of work though.  Luckily while hubby was home for a few weeks some time ago, we got the front done.  Generally by hanging half off the roof and scraping with the hooks of hammers and sanding for hours, but it got done.  

 
 

Unfortunately, the back and sides of the house will still need fully scraped and sanded and I haven't quite figured out how to get under the gutter on the back, either.  That is a question for another day though.

My biggest challenge right now is trying to figure out how to paint areas that won't get rained on with early afternoon storms rolling through every day.

But in the meantime, I got my mini-hot-tub drain replaced and back in working order.  So after a hard day's work I can toss on my swim-suit and soak in the jets and bubbles.  

 

Yeah... it needs a nice surround built for it, but that is a project that comes after finishing painting the house, re-laying the patio bricks, and taking a long winter nap... or two.


     POST LINKS FORWARD TO:
          8/17/2017 4:25:11 PM - Replace a damaged trim section, and Painting the House is "Done".
     POST LINKS BACK TO:
          6/24/2017 2:36:44 PM - Paint Progress


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